Dyslecsia Cymru / Wales Dyslexia

Our vision is to make Wales the best place in the world for the dyslexic individual to live, learn, work and develop to their full potential.

Our vision is to make Wales the best place in the world for the dyslexic individual to live, learn, work and develop to their full potential.

Help at School

Things the dyslexic child may find difficult

This page can be downloaded as a PDF document here.

Because of the auditory and visual difficulties associated with dyslexia, the dyslexic child may have problems with some, or all, of the following in school:

  • Organisation
  • Memory
  • Reading
  • Time
  • Direction
  • Sequencing
  • Self-esteem

Auditory processing difficulties can lead to problems with:

  • Discrimination of speech sounds
  • Sound blending
  • Naming
  • Auditory sequencing
  • Serial memory (auditory)

Visual processing difficulties can lead to problems with:

  • Discrimination of size and form of letters, numbers
  • Reversals (for example letters, b/d, p/q or letter order (for example, saw/was)
  • Scanning text from left to right
  • Recognising letter characters
  • Serial memory (visual)

How to support the dyslexic child in the classroom

Providing instructions. The dyslexic pupil can have difficulties with sequencing and memory.

  • Keep instructions to a minimum and check the pupil has heard them correctly. It helps to ask the pupil to repeat the instructions (verbal rehearsal).
  • Give instructions at a steady pace and make sure you have the pupil’s undivided attention.
  • Show as well as tell the pupil how to do something – the board may not always prove the best way of doing this for your pupil with dyslexia.
  • Try to avoid giving important instructions if the pupil is tired, anxious or hurrying to finish something.
  • Make sure instructions for homework are written down correctly and include what equipment may be needed to complete it.

Teaching strategies. Provide the pupil with strategies to help mitigate the effects of dyslexia

  • Multisensory teaching methods, which are good for the dyslexic pupil, are also beneficial for all pupils.
  • Teach the child how to verbally rehearse information needed for a short while such as when taking a message.
  • Allow the child to mutter the words quietly to him/herself when copying from a book or the board.
  • Mouthing the words helps if he/she is reluctant to say them. This can also help when reading text for information.
  • Have the child sit near you during shared activities and attract their attention to the part being discussed by pointing to it frequently.
  • Provide a ‘Dyslexia Friendly’ Timetable – use pictures to represent the lesson topics, for example, a pyramid for history, violin for music. Put an enlarged version up for everyone.
  • Colour-coding is very helpful for the younger pupil with dyslexia to manage the classroom resources.

Memory strategies. Working memory is an enormous difficulty for a dyslexic person – teach them how to remember things more easily.

  • We all remember things more easily if we organise them into groups, patterns, or categories.
  • We remember unusual things, things that interest us most and it is hard to remember things we do not understand.
  • We can only remember a few things at a time, and if we chunk the information it is more manageable.
  • Our memory works by building links and we remember things better if we already know something about them.
  • Learning is an active task – we all (dyslexic or not) have to think about how we can remember something. This is reassuring for a pupil with dyslexia!

Try to help with self-esteem. The dyslexic pupil can lack self-esteem.

  • Try to provide achievable tasks and praise success.
  • When asking questions be sure to allow the pupil plenty of ‘thinking time’.